USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #4101

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Check out today’s Step 1 Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #4101A 19-year-old college student presents for evaluation of persistently enlarged nontender supraclavicular lymph nodes. She says she is otherwise healthy and provides no significant medical history. She is experiencing night sweats and has had a 4.5-kg (10-lb) weight loss over the past 3 months. Three supraclavicular lymph nodes are palpable above her right shoulder. No other lymphadenopathy is noted. On X-ray of the chest, mediastinal lymphadenopathy is noted. Results of a lymph node biopsy are shown in the image.

Which of the following is the most likely diagnosis?

A. Burkitt lymphoma
B. Follicular lymphoma
C. Hodgkin lymphoma, lymphocyte-depleted type
D. Hodgkin lymphoma, nodular-sclerosing type
E. T-lymphocyte lymphoblastic lymphoma

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Want to know the ‘bottom line?’ Purchase a USMLE-Rx Subscription and get many more features, more questions, and passages from First Aid, including images, references, and other facts relevant to this question.

This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 1 test bank. For more USMLE Step 1 prep, subscribe to our Flash Facts and Step 1 Express video series. Score the best deal on all three products with a Step 1 Triple Play Bundle.

Mnemonic Monday: PERCH on a “Peak” – Picornavirus

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By Molly Lewis

Viruses… not only can they literally make you sick to your stomach from gastroenteritis, but trying to remember their classifications can cause significant nausea as well!

The solution? No, it’s not oral rehydration therapy or ondansetron – try a mnemonic!

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Mnemonic Monday: “HEN PEcKS” – 1st + 2nd Generation Cephalosporins

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hen pecks

By Molly Lewis

Learning antibiotics can be quite overwhelming- trade names, generic names, spectrums of activity, side effects, etc.- so many details! To make it a bit more manageable, I used as many mnemonics as I could find or create! Here is one of my favorites.

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“‘Twas the Shift Before Christmas”: A Holiday Ode to Med Students

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Happy Holidays

By the First Aid Team

‘Twas the shift before Christmas, when all through the wards
Not a creature was stirring, they were studying for boards;
The stethoscopes were hung by the front desk with care,
In hopes that the First Aid Team soon would be there;

The med students were waiting all snug in their scrubs,
As they took a few minutes to inhale some bad grub;
A doctor in her ‘kerchief, and I in my mask,
Had just settled in for a long surgical task,

When out in the parking lot arose such a clatter,
I sprang from the OR to see what was the matter.
Away to the pit I flew like a flash,
And ran into a big guy with a skid and a crash.

His eyes — how they twinkled! He breathed a deep sigh!
His face was so red, his BP clearly too high!
Still, behind him soon did appear,
An ambulance-sized sleigh loaded with Step study gear.

He spoke not a word, but went straight to the ED,
And asked the head nurse to refill his ARB,
Then, laying his finger aside of his nose,
And giving a nod, up the elevator he rose;

He strode through the wards, passing out Qmax and Flash Facts galore,
While gunners ran beside, shouting wishes for perfect Step exam scores.
The rest of us gaped and grinned as we grasped,
A free, three-month subscription to Step 1 Express.

This guy was laughing and happy, a right jolly old elf,
And I knew when I saw him, I’d pass my next shelf;
With First Aid for the USMLE books, I’d have knowledge in my head,
And with such great study guides, I had nothing to dread;

He passed out his last batch of study tools, and sprang to his sleigh
Turned on the siren and fired up the bay;
I heard him exclaim, ere he drove out of sight,
HAPPY HOLIDAYS TO ALL, AND TO ALL A GOOD NIGHT!

What’s New in First Aid for the USMLE Step 1 2016

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2016 FA1 Book CoverFirst Aid for the USMLE Step 1 2016 is finally here! The new edition is a labor of love representing thousands of hours of coordinated effort over the past nine months by dozens of student authors and editors, faculty experts, illustrators, and editorial staff. Some of the more notable highlights include:

  • 50+ entirely new facts, including a new section on quality improvement principles and safety science (p. 44).
  • Hundreds of major (and thousands of minor) fact updates culled from more than 100,000 comments and suggestions by experienced medical students and board review experts.
  • 50 new or revised full-color photos to help visualize various disorders, descriptive findings, and basic science concepts. Labeling, colors, and arrows have been optimized to enhance learning and retention.
  • Dozens of new and revised line diagrams that integrate pathophysiology, therapeutics, and diseases into memorable frameworks for annotation and personalization. We are sharing some example redlined pages embedded below and here so you can better appreciate the nature and extent of revisions throughout the text.
  • Thicker, embossed cover and heavy-duty binding for increased durability and longevity.

We hope you enjoy this book as much as we enjoyed putting it together. Verified errata (when available) can be found exclusively here on our blog. First Aid for the USMLE Step 1 is a perpetual “work in progress,” and we invite you to share your thoughts and ideas here on our blog to help us continually improve the book for future learners.

Happy holidays and best wishes for your studies in the new year,

The First Aid Team

SAMPLE FIRST AID 2016 REVISIONS

 

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #4094

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Check out today’s Step 1 Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #4094A 55-year-old woman has received treatment for years to manage a chronic, progressive disease. Since her mid-40s the patient has had difficulty initiating movements. She has a shuffling gait, an expressionless face, and tremor in her hands and fingers at rest. Over the years she has tried many medications but with little relief of her symptoms, and instead has experienced severe adverse effects. She is referred for possible ablation surgery. The neurosurgeon explains the different pathways involved in initiation and inhibition of movement, the foundation of her disease. The neurosurgeon explains that by nullifying or accentuating some of the pathways, some of her symptoms may be alleviated.

The introduction of an ablative lesion into which structure labeled in the image would be expected to improve this patient’s bradykinesia?

A. A
B. B
C. C
D. D
E. E

———————–

Want to know the ‘bottom line?’ Purchase a USMLE-Rx Subscription and get many more features, more questions, and passages from First Aid, including images, references, and other facts relevant to this question.

This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 1 test bank. For more USMLE Step 1 prep, subscribe to our Flash Facts and Step 1 Express video series. Score the best deal on all three products with a Step 1 Triple Play Bundle.

Mnemonic Monday: “FEEL My Conjunctivitis” – Kawasaki Disease Mnemonic

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By Molly Lewis

Kawasaki disease (AKA mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome) may sound like a rare entity found only in Japan, but it happens more often than you might expect- in the US, 19 children per 100,000 each year! It is a systemic vasculitis that most often affects young kids, and is idiopathic (no known cause). It can be surprisingly difficult to distinguish it from scarlet fever and erythema multiforme. So, here is a helpful mnemonic to remember the criteria for diagnosing Kawasaki’s!

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