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Mnemonic Monday Structures of the Diaphragm

What’s the Best Way to Study for the Internal Medicine Shelf Exam

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By Ravish Amin

The internal medicine shelf exam is the most important exam for medical students because it tests your knowledge of the most common medical concepts encountered on rotations such as cardiology, gastroenterology, hematology/oncology, rheumatology, pulmonology, neurology, nephrology, infectious diseases, endocrinology, and primary care medicine. These subjects obviously form a majority of questions and answers on shelf exams, but it’s important to develop core strengths in subjects most interesting to you by devoting extra effort and time to details that could increase scores. While it’s nearly impossible to predict what combination of questions your shelf exam will include, implementing the following study methods may help you get started, and with enough review, prepare you for the shelf exam.

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Best Way to Study for the Family Medicine Shelf Exam

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By Ravish Amin

Are you in the beginning stages of preparing for the family medicine shelf exam? What patients did you see on rotations? Do you have the right books and core knowledge? This blog post will review important tips and study methods designed to help you ace the family medicine shelf.

It’s important on the family medicine rotation to familiarize yourself with the broad topics you may encounter on the shelf exam. Personally, I found it very useful to create my own clinical case vignettes while diagnosing patients on rotations in the outpatient clinic.

Often, the family medicine shelf has subspecialty topics such as migraines, dermatology, physical medicine, and rehabilitation, which may all be incorporated into your core family medicine rotations.

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USMLE-Rx Step 2 Qmax Challenge #21610

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Check out today’s Step 2 CK Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it in the comments below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 2 Qmax Challenge #21610A 75-year-old man presents to his family physician with a 3-day history of joint pain. The patient has had various “aches and pains” in his joints over the years, but in the past 3 days he has noticed that his first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint in his left foot has become very painful. He describes the pain as a dull, constant ache, 7 of 10 in severity. He denies any recent trauma or exposure to infectious agents. The remainder of his musculoskeletal examination is normal, with full range of motion and no focal tenderness in any of his other joints. The first MTP in the left foot is warm, erythematous, and extremely tender to touch. Synovial fluid presents with elevated WBCs and no RBCs, and a Gram stain is negative. Polarized light microscopy is shown in the image below.

Which of the following is the most likely diagnosis?

A. Acute gout
B. Osteoarthritis
C. Rheumatoid arthritis
D. Septic arthritis
E. Systemic lupus erythematosus

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Want to know the ‘bottom line?’ Purchase a USMLE-Rx Subscription and get many more features, more questions, and passages from First Aid, including images, references, and other facts relevant to this question.

This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 2 CK test bank. Get more Step 2 CK study help at USMLE-Rx.com.

Mnemonic Monday – Positions of Heart Auscultation

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By Haley Masterson

All Physicians Take Money

(Aortic, Pulmonic, Tricuspid, Mitral)

From left to right across your chest:  A is the right upper sternal border (the second right interspace), P is the left upper sternal border (the second left interspace), T is the left lower sternal border, and M is the apex.

 

Please note that these are guidelines to aid you in diagnosis on test questions; they are not necessarily going to be physiologically true in all cases. (more…)

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #4019

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Check out today’s Step 1 Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #4019A 46-year-old man presents with a temperature of 38.6°C (101.5°F). He was fine 2 weeks ago, but started feeling poorly a few days ago after a dental examination. Physical examination reveals tender raised lesions on the beds of his fingers and toes, and painless, erythematous lesions on his palms and soles, like those in the images. On further questioning, the physician discovers that the man has a history of rheumatic fever as a child. Blood cultures are drawn.

The most likely causative organism will have which characteristics?

A. Gram-positive cocci, catalase-negative, β-hemolytic, bacitracin-resistant
B. Gram-positive cocci, catalase-negative, β-hemolytic, bacitracin-sensitive
C. Gram-positive cocci, catalase-negative, α-hemolytic, optochin-resistant
D. Gram-positive cocci, catalase-positive
E. Gram-positive, weakly acid-fast rod

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Want to know the ‘bottom line?’ Purchase a USMLE-Rx Subscription and get many more features, more questions, and passages from First Aid, including images, references, and other facts relevant to this question.

This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 1 test bank. For more USMLE Step 1 prep, subscribe to our Flash Facts and Step 1 Express video series. Score the best deal on all three products with a Step 1 Triple Play Bundle.

Mnemonic Monday: Cyanotic Congenital Heart Defects

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By Haley Masterson

This mnemonic has been passed around pediatric residency programs for decades but is rarely mentioned in the medical school setting (which is unfortunate, because it works so well).  

The 5 Cyanotic Congenital Heart Defects are as easy as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

One big trunk:   Truncus arteriosus.

Two interchanged vessels:  Transposition of the Great Vessels.

ThreeTriscuspid Atresia.

FourTetralogy of Fallot.

Five words:  Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return. (more…)

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