Abstracts, Ads, and the Exams: 6 Tips for Approaching Step 2 Abstract and Ad Questions

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By Edison Cano

Abstracts Ads and the ExamsMedical abstracts and drug ads are an especially difficult addition to the USMLE Step 2 exam, especially for International Medical Graduates unfamiliar with American “Big Pharma.” Here are some key points to help you approach this type of question. (more…)

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3777

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Check out today’s Step 1 Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3777A 26-year-old man presents with left eye pain and intermittent double vision. When at rest, his left eye is deviated downward and laterally, as pictured in the image. Upgaze and adduction are limited in the affected eye; however, abduction appears intact. Also, the left lid droops, and the left pupil is dilated and unresponsive to light as shown in the image.

Which of the following cranial nerves is most likely to have been injured?

A. Abducens nerve
B. Oculomotor nerve
C. Optic nerve
D. Trigeminal nerve
E. Trochlear nerve

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Want to know the ‘bottom line?’ Purchase a USMLE-Rx Subscription and get many more features, more questions, and passages from First Aid, including images, references, and other facts relevant to this question.

This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 1 test bank. For more USMLE Step 1 prep, subscribe to our Flash Facts and Step 1 Express video series. Score the best deal on all three products with a Step 1 Triple Play Bundle.

Mnemonic Monday: What a Pain in the Back!

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By Joe Savarese

What a Pain in the BackAbout a year ago, I was scrolling through some medical humor website and I came across this meme. I laughed and then swiped to the next picture without a second thought. I recently came across the meme again. To be honest, I laughed again, but I also took a second to think (because overthinking is what I do best) about clerkships years.

As my third year of medical school comes to a close, I think about some of the medical conditions that are brought up over and over again by patients – vague complaints of headaches, back pain, abdominal pain, weakness, fatigue, etc. They are simple medical concepts to nearly everyone, but a wide differential diagnosis and varying clinical picture make it difficult to narrow them down to a specific condition without forgetting others.

I think organization is the key. An organized approach to the patient interview and physical exam are certainly learned skills that we practice frequently throughout the third and fourth years. As for the differential diagnosis and management, that part is up to you, books, and mnemonics. Hope this one helps for back pain. (more…)

USMLE-Rx Step 2 Qmax Challenge #21543

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Check out today’s Step 1 Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 2 Qmax Challenge #21543A 7-year-old girl presents to the emergency department complaining of chest pain and pain in her lower extremities that occurred twice earlier that day while she was running at school. The chest pain as left-sided, dull, nonradiating, and accompanied by a headache. These symptoms have occurred previously, although the patient cannot recall when these episodes first began. Her temperature is 37°C (98.6°F), pulse is 140/min, blood pressure is 135/90 mm Hg, and respiratory rate is 22/min. Her lungs are clear, and cardiac examination reveals normal S1 and S2sounds, with a continuous murmur best heard over her back, between her scapulae. X-ray of her chest is shown in the image.

What additional physical examination findings would you expect in this patient?

A. A sudden episode of cyanosis that is partially relieved by squatting
B. Blue skin and general failure to thrive
C. Decreased breath sounds over bilateral lung bases
D. Normal additional findings of physical examination
E. Notching of the ribs

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Want to know the ‘bottom line?’ Purchase a USMLE-Rx Subscription and get many more features, more questions, and passages from First Aid, including images, references, and other facts relevant to this question.

This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 2 CK test bank. Get more Step 2 CK study help at USMLE-Rx.com.

 

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3726

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Check out today’s Step 1 Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3726A 62-year-old man visits his primary care doctor because of increasing fatigue that started about 2 years ago. Routine workup shows a low hematocrit and a fecal occult blood test is positive. His doctor recommends colonoscopy which shows a lesion oozing blood. A partial colectomy is performed, and the specimen, shown in the image, is sent to pathology.

Which of the following lesion types most predisposes the patient to the pathologic process shown in the image?

A. Tubular adenoma; large polyp
B. Tubular adenoma; small polyp
C. Tubulovillous adenoma; large polyp
D. Villous adenoma; large polyp
E. Villous adenoma; small polyp

———————–

Want to know the ‘bottom line?’ Purchase a USMLE-Rx Subscription and get many more features, more questions, and passages from First Aid, including images, references, and other facts relevant to this question.

This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 1 test bank. For more USMLE Step 1 prep, subscribe to our Flash Facts and Step 1 Express video series. Score the best deal on all three products with a Step 1 Triple Play Bundle.

How to Succeed in Internal Medicine

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By Mark Ard

Internal Medicine (IM from here on out) is a beast. It usually consists of both inpatient and outpatient, and for those going into one of the various subspecialties, it is a glimpse of the journey you will all go through. You will be tested on aspects of almost every specialty, as well as deal with many of the non-tested realities of medicine in the real world, like how to write discharge summaries, deal with insurance companies, etc. I thoroughly enjoyed my medicine rotation, though you wouldn’t know it by all the complaining. Below are some general tips to not only honor the rotation but to set yourself up for a good experience and possibly procure some letters of recommendation. You might notice some of the tips are similar to my previous post, How to Succeed on the Pediatric Clerkship. That’s because success in 3rd year really revolves around some key themes. Apply them and you will do well. (more…)

Surviving Step 1: Setting Goals for Step 1

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By Walter Wiggins

In my post (“Preparing for the Boards”), we discussed several things you can and should be doing right now to get yourself ready for Step 1. Now that Step 1 is on your mind, you may have a number in mind for your ideal Step 1 score. Coming up with this number can be tough, as your Step 1 score is an important criterion by which you are evaluated by residency programs. More competitive residency programs will want to see higher Step 1 scores. Satisfaction with your performance requires planning, hard work, and knowing what your goals are before you’re too far along.

(more…)

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