What’s Your Learning Type: Part 2 – The MBTI Approach to Learning

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By Mark Ard

What’s Your Learning Type Part 2This is the second part in a series on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. Read part one here.

Last time we talked about Extraversion vs. Introversion and Judgers vs. Perceivers. The key message was that we tend to be more comfortable in either action and expression or reservation and contemplation. We are energized when we seek environments that harmonize with our preferences. Furthermore, we tend to thrive in either chaos or order and seek to organize our lives in patterns that bring us peace.

Now we move to the Sensor vs. iNtuitive dichotomy. This is a question about how you gather and relate to information and therefore is the single most important learning type to understand for the preclinical years. (more…)

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3975

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Check out today’s Step 1 Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3975A 43-year-old man presents three days after returning from a rafting trip to South America. He complains of flu-like symptoms as well as headache, photophobia, and pain in his knees and lower back. He says that his appetite is poor and he has been nauseated but has not vomited. He is febrile at 39°C (102.2°F) with a pulse of 72/min. On abdominal examination, he is tender in the epigastrium and his liver edge is palpable 3 cm below the costal margin. The physician orders a complete blood count and liver function tests, which show a WBC count of 2000/mm³ with 40% neutrophils, aspartate aminotransferase of 900 U/L, and alanine aminotransferase of 350 U/L. The patient’s condition worsens and he is hospitalized. A liver biopsy is performed. The specimen is shown in the image.

What is this patient’s most likely diagnosis?

A. Dengue fever
B. Hepatitis A
C. Hepatitis B
D. Yellow fever

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This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 1 test bank. For more USMLE Step 1 prep, subscribe to our Flash Facts and Step 1 Express video series. Score the best deal on all three products with a Step 1 Triple Play Bundle.

A Guide to Getting Publications and Presentations in Med School

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By Tim Durso

A Guide to Getting Publications and Presentations in Med SchoolIf you’re a medical student, you’ve probably that research is important to getting a competitive residency position. Sometimes it feels like if you don’t have ten first author publications by the end of first year, you’ll end up practicing rural medicine in Topeka, Kansas (not that there’s anything wrong with that). For those of you looking to get involved in research, I have put together a list of things that I’ve learned throughout my first three years of school that helped me get involved in productive research.

(more…)

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3972

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Check out today’s Step 1 Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3972A 2-year-old child has no red reflex in the right eye. He is subsequently found to have an eye tumor, as shown in the image, that is caused by dysfunction of a specific cell-cycle regulatory gene product.

What is the normal function of this gene product in a quiescent cell?

A. Prevents cell-cycle progression past the G1/S checkpoint
B. Prevents cell-cycle progression past the G2/M checkpint
C. Promotes DNA damage repair
D. Promotes histone acetylation
E. Regulates apoptosis and angiogenesis

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Want to know the ‘bottom line?’ Purchase a USMLE-Rx Subscription and get many more features, more questions, and passages from First Aid, including images, references, and other facts relevant to this question.

This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 1 test bank. For more USMLE Step 1 prep, subscribe to our Flash Facts and Step 1 Express video series. Score the best deal on all three products with a Step 1 Triple Play Bundle.

Networking for IMGs

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By Edison Cano

Networking for IMGsA few years back, I thought the quest for a residency spot in the US was strictly dominated by scores and academic activities. While these are important, other aspects of increasing exposure to programs began to stand out. As in any career, I realized networking is of paramount importance in medicine, especially for IMG and FMG students.

The rationale behind networking is simple: most of us are looking for opportunities to break into the US. Broadly speaking, that usually includes research, an observership, and ultimately, a residency. After spending several years in medical school outside the US, little can be gleaned just from the name of our med school, research, letters of recommendation from our home country and even USMLE scores. We need to have established relationships so residency directors know who we are. (more…)

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3966

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Check out today’s Step 1 Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3966A 50-year-old Chinese immigrant presents to his primary care physician complaining of fever, night sweats, and blood-tinged sputum for the past 3 weeks. An x-ray of the chest, shown in the image, is remarkable for opacity in the right upper lobe.

Which of the following adverse effects is commonly associated with a drug used in the treatment of this man’s disease?

A. Blue and yellow color blindness
B. Myalgias
C. Numbness and tingling
D. Ophthalmoplegia
E. Renal failure

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Want to know the ‘bottom line?’ Purchase a USMLE-Rx Subscription and get many more features, more questions, and passages from First Aid, including images, references, and other facts relevant to this question.

This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 1 test bank. For more USMLE Step 1 prep, subscribe to our Flash Facts and Step 1 Express video series. Score the best deal on all three products with a Step 1 Triple Play Bundle.

Mnemonic Monday: Structures of the Diaphragm

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By Haley Masterson

Mnemonics are an important tool for approaching Gross Anatomy. Here’s one for the diaphragm that will help you not only in orienting yourself in the lab, but also in identifying cross-sectional levels on x-rays in the future.

I Ate 10 Eggs At 12

The diaphragm has 3 main hiatuses – the hiatus of the inferior vena cava (IVC), the esophageal hiatus, and the aortic hiatus. The IVC passes through the diaphragm at the level of T8 (I “ate”), the esophagus passes at the level of T10 (“10 Eggs”), and the aorta passes through at the level of T12.

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