Med School Done Right: You Only Have Room For Big Rocks – Part 2

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By Luke Murray

This post is part of a series called “Med School Done Right,” which will look at not just succeeding in medical school in the narrow terms of “getting good grades,” but at shaping the kind of experiences you want to have during these (usually) four very important years of your life.

In my last post, I wrote about a metaphor for time management posed by a professor who went on to explain that the lesson was: (1) if you don’t fit the big “rocks” in first, you never will (his explicit point) and (2) that you have more free time than you think (the implicit point, driven home by his demonstration). Here’s how and why I think his explicit message of “fit big rocks first, and then fit everything else later” doesn’t work, especially for medical students.

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DO Corner: What the Changes in DO Residencies Mean to You

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By Sean Martin

I think many osteopathic students and residents agree it is a good time to be a DO.  The AOA and ACGME have agreed to pursue a common graduate medical education accreditation system.  This is a major victory for osteopathic students who were very close to having serious limitations put on them by the proposed common program requirement.

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Surviving Step 1: Test Format & Scoring

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By Walter Wiggins

The USMLE Step 1 is unlike any test you’ve taken before. Therefore, it’s important to know how it works before you walk in the door of the testing center on test day. In this post, I’ll go over the format of the test and how it is scored.

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Surviving Step 1: Scheduling & Attempt Limits

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By Walter Wiggins

To 2nd years and others planning to take the USMLE Step 1 this year, below is a list of a few things you should do ASAP, if you haven’t already.

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Med School Done Right: You Only Have Room For Big Rocks – Part 1

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By Luke Murray

This post is part of a series called “Med School Done Right,” which will look at not just succeeding in medical school in the narrow terms of “getting good grades,” but at shaping the kind of experiences you want to have during these (usually) four very important years of your life.

In my last post, we talked about the importance of answering the question:  “What do you want?” and “Why do you want it?”

We discussed the difficulty and importance of answering the “Why?” question, and I said that it’s important to do this in every area of your life.  What I didn’t clarify was to what extent this was healthy and effective.  For an answer to that, I want to turn to a story you’ve probably heard before, about a professor giving a brand new class of students a lecture about goal setting and time management. I then will proceed to tell you how the advice implied by this well-worn story doesn’t work.  Here’s the story, adapted from this version.

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DO Corner: Using Q-Banks to Prepare for COMLEX Level 1

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By Sean Martin

One of the best resources to prepare for the boards is a question bank.  Question banks let you review commonly tested material in a format similar to what you will see on test day.  But, for osteopathic students preparing to take the boards, question banks can be a little tricky.  Many students feel they can get away with using USMLE banks like USMLEWorld to prepare for the COMLEX exam.  However, this kind of prep may end in major disappointment when scores are released.  While USMLE banks are a great resource, osteopathic students should really consider purchasing a COMLEX bank to help prepare for COMLEX-style questions.

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IMG Info: Tips for Obtaining Sub-Internships in the United States

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By Sarah Wesley

The sub-internship (sub-I) is a 3-4 week period during which final-year medical students work as unpaid interns, often with a much lighter patient load but with all the responsibilities and tasks of an intern.  Many competitive residency institutions require that IMG applicant have completed a minimum of 1-2 sub-Is in the U.S. in order to be considered for a spot.  Some applicants will have the finances and time to complete many more than the required number of sub-Is, and you should specifically research the requirements on the websites of the programs and specialties you are interested in.

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