Mnemonic Monday: PMS, Angry Ladies, and the External Carotid Artery

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By Molly Lewis

We’ve all had mini “anatomy panic attacks.” Maybe you’re in an anatomy practical and have only 30 seconds to identify the flagged structure, or maybe you’re in the OR and your attending asks: “What’s this?” Regardless of the situation, using mnemonics to remember anatomy can turn panic into confidence!

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Surviving Step 1: Approach to Preparation

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By Walter Wiggins

Recently, Luke Murray wrote the first post in his series “Med School Done Right,” which is all about maximizing your experience in medical school based on your broader goals and aspirations. One of the key tenets to his approach to med school is determining what you want to get out of each individual experience in your training and why that will help you achieve your broader goals. When it comes time to start thinking about your approach to preparing for the USMLE Step 1 (or COMLEX Level 1), I recommend you consider these two questions:

  1. What do you want to get out of Step 1?
  2. Why will that help you achieve your broader goals?

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Med School Done Right: First, ask “What?” Second, ask “Why?”

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By Luke Murray

This is the first post in a series called “Med School Done Right,” which will look at not just succeeding in medical school in the narrow terms of “getting good grades,” but at shaping the kind of experience you want to have during these (usually) four very important years of your life.

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IMG Info: Applying to Specialist Training in the U.S.

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By Sarah Wesley

The decision to move to a different country and work in a different medical system can be daunting.  When one trains in a certain system, one is prepared for working within that system, often having mentors and a sophisticated understanding of what is expected of them.  However, specialist training in the U.S. provides a multitude of benefits that help to reconcile the complications of moving out of one’s comfort zone.

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Mnemonic Monday: 7 Cute Ladies- Mnemonics for the Patient Interview

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By Molly Lewis

Whether you are a first year in Physical Diagnosis class, a second year in Continuity Clinic, a third year seeing consults, or an attending deciding if a patient needs emergency surgery, taking a complete history is a key aspect of patient care. How can you remember everything you need to ask? Try a mnemonic!

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Surviving Step 1: Study Methods

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By Walter Wiggins

The evaluation of your study process should be continual throughout medical school. However, it is particularly important to fine-tune your study methods in the months leading up to your dedicated study period for Step 1. It is important to evaluate the things you’re doing well and the things you aren’t doing as well, so that you can maximize your efficiency with studying each subject. You’ll likely find that what works well for you in one subject does not work as well in other areas. There may be other aspects of your study process that change as time goes along, as well. This post will cover some of the stumbling blocks I ran across and the “executive decisions” I made to get around them.

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Careers in Medicine: What do you want to be when you graduate?

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By Vamsi K. Kancherla

You just started medical school and are beginning to get used to the routine of lectures, labs, studying, and taking tests. While this is quite nostalgic of your undergraduate days, medical school will certainly challenge you in different ways. To help you navigate the next four years, we’ve prepared an overview of what to expect and when to make those important decisions.

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