USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3493

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Check out today’s Step 1 Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3493A 45-year-old man presents with a low-grade fever, hoarseness, cough, and a sore throat. On physical examination, he has swollen cervical lymph nodes. Gram stain of his sputum is obtained, and the specimen is shown in the image. Secretions obtained from the patient’s tonsils are analyzed using polymerase chain reaction, and a diagnostic protein subunit is found.

The exotoxin responsible for his symptoms inhibits protein synthesis by which of the following mechanisms?

A. Activation of adenyl cyclase by adenosine diphosphate ribosylation
B. Activation of Gs
C. Adenosine diphosphate ribosylation of elongation factor 2
D. Inhibition of Gi
E. Stimulating macrophages to release tumor necrosis factor-?

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Want to know the ‘bottom line?’ Purchase a USMLE-Rx Subscription and get many more features, more questions, and passages from First Aid, including images, references, and other facts relevant to this question.

This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 1 test bank. For more USMLE Step 1 prep, subscribe to our Flash Facts and Step 1 Express video series. Score the best deal on all three products with a Step 1 Triple Play Bundle.

Mnemonic Monday: Hypersensitivity Reactions

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By Haley Masterson

The 4 categories of hypersensitivity reactions is one of those subjects many students suspect we’ll never need to remember. But, in fact, this topic will likely haunt us for the rest of our medical career no matter what field we go into (even surgical residents have to review this topic for their ABSITE exam), so you may as well memorize the 4 categories now.

(more…)

USMLE Exams: What is a good score?

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By Edison Cano

A commonly asked question among US graduates and International Medical Graduates (IMGs) is what is a good score on the USMLE exams? While we all agree that higher scores are better, there are wildly differing opinions amongst friends, classmates, and various internet resources.

This question becomes harder to answer because we all come from different backgrounds and with different expectations, but as we all have different plans, time, and responsibilities, we need to tailor our work based on our own goals. (more…)

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3488

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Check out today’s Step 1 Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3488A 33-year-old woman presents to her physician complaining of fatigue and joint aches. On physical examination, her doctor notices abnormalities in her skin, which are seen in the image. Laboratory studies show antinuclear and anti-Sm antibodies. Urinalysis shows RBC casts and 2.1 g protein per 24 hours. A renal biopsy is performed.

Which of the following diseases has a similar cellular mechanism of disease progress?

A. Acute serum sickness
B. Cellulitis
C. Cervical carcinoma
D. Contact dermatitis
E. Goodpasture’s disease
F. Graves’ disease

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Want to know the ‘bottom line?’ Purchase a USMLE-Rx Subscription and get many more features, more questions, and passages from First Aid, including images, references, and other facts relevant to this question.

This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 1 test bank. For more USMLE Step 1 prep, subscribe to our Flash Facts and Step 1 Express video series. Score the best deal on all three products with a Step 1 Triple Play Bundle.

What’s in a Name?

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By Joe Savarese

Mnemonics are definitely useful tools for medical students – useful for quick recall and short-memory techniques on frequently difficult topics. However, I found that when I am in the exam room with 72 seconds per question, my mind likely will not remember the twelve cranial nerves with this classic long sentence: “On old Olympus’s towering tops, a Finn and German viewed some hops.”

I prefer an acronym where each letter can stand for various items without the goofy sentence or I will commonly reshape the word in such a way that I can recall something significant about it. The latter method gives me the opportunity to remember forgotten memorized facts if I am stuck on an exam question. We have all had those moments where we recognize the word, yet we forgot everything about it. Instead we sit in the exam room and continuously repeat “Oprelvekin. Oprelvekin. Oprelvekin.” while changing our emphasis on different syllables.

Below are a few examples of difficult drugs (in my opinion) that I used while studying for Step 1. (more…)

Recognize the Need to Change Course, and then do it

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By Luke Murray

Recognize the Need to Change Course, and then do itI have lots of different regrets about my time in medical school. I should have tried more things professionally, personally, and socially. I can’t tell you how many nights I sat in my room thinking I would go out that night or call someone up to hang out but thought, “I need to get to bed in a hour so I don’t really have time…” So instead of actually spending time with someone for an hour, I’d watch YouTube videos for the next two hours. In hindsight, I should have made this mistake once or twice, wised up, and then spent that time with friends or even strangers – anything really. But I didn’t, and the naturally isolating experience of medical school remained so for much of my time there. I left a lot of memories and potential friendships on the table during those years.

Another regret has to do with the way I studied. Like my social decisions, I should have known and admitted something was wrong much sooner than I did. I didn’t do well on my first quiz in anatomy just a few weeks into medical school (I failed it, actually). At that time, my strategy was to be as thorough as possible with each pass through the material, to just make sure my eyes saw as large of a percentage of the content as there was for them to see. As an obvious consequence, I only got through the material a couple times (if I was lucky) before a test. I did poorly, again, and then vow that I would study even harder, be even more thorough, next time around. No paradigm-altering changes, just doubling down on an obviously losing strategy, thinking that ‘time spent’ was the only variable that needed tweaking. I continued to stay in the bottom of my class, until my second time through my second year. (more…)

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3479

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Check out today’s Step 1 Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3479A 23-year-old man presents to his physician after losing consciousness. A friend who was with the man at the time told him that, while he was unconscious, he looked like he was having a “fit.” The friend reports that the patient lost control of bowel and bladder function during the episode. The patient denies drug or alcohol use. The physician prescribes him a medication to control the problem. Three weeks later, the patient returns to the doctor to report a rash that has developed since he started taking the medication. The rash involves both the skin and the mucous membranes. The rash began as macular and then developed bullae that ruptured, as shown in the image. Despite stopping the drugs, the patient dies.

Which of the following medications most likely caused this rash?

A. Clonazepam
B. Gabapentin
C. Lamotrigine
D. Phenobarbital
E. Topiramate

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Want to know the ‘bottom line?’ Purchase a USMLE-Rx Subscription and get many more features, more questions, and passages from First Aid, including images, references, and other facts relevant to this question.

This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 1 test bank. For more USMLE Step 1 prep, subscribe to our Flash Facts and Step 1 Express video series. Score the best deal on all three products with a Step 1 Triple Play Bundle.

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