Mnemonics

Mnemonic Monday: The 5 Hs and 5 Ts of Cardiac Arrest

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By Michael Spinner

Cardiac arrest, defined by the loss of functional circulation, is a true medical emergency that may rapidly progress to death if not addressed immediately.

Emergent stabilizing measures include defibrillation for patients with a “shockable rhythm” (i.e. ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia) and immediate CPR and epinephrine for patients with a “non-shockable rhythm” (i.e. asystole or pulseless electrical activity).

After calling a code and initiating these emergent stabilizing measures, the American Heart Association Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) program states that healthcare providers should assess for any potentially reversible causes of the arrest and treat the patient accordingly. Remember the 5Hs and 5Ts listed below to rapidly recall the causes of cardiac arrest:

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Mnemonic Monday: The CURB-65 Criteria – Prognosis & Management of Pneumonia

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By Michael Spinner

The CURB-65 Criteria – Prognosis & Management of PneumoniaThe prognosis and management of community-acquired pneumonia may vary considerably from patient to patient. Some are treated effectively with oral antibiotics in the outpatient setting, others should be hospitalized for IV antibiotics, and the most severe cases may require ICU admission to provide ventilatory and/or hemodynamic support. Use the CURB-65 criteria listed below to help estimate the prognosis and determine the appropriate management for patients with community-acquired pneumonia:

C – Confusion (new change in mental status)

U – Urea >7 mmol/L

R – Respiratory rate ³30

B – Blood pressure <90 systolic or £60 diastolic

65 – Age ³65

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The Crazy Carpals: How to Remember Them All??

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By Molly Lewis

So many wrist bones, so little time- how to remember them all? Try these mnemonics!

There are about a million mnemonics out there for the bones of your wrist (AKA carpals), some with higher moral standards than others :). Here are two to get you started:

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Mnemonic Monday: AEIOU – Indications for Dialysis in Patients with Acute Kidney Injury

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By Michael Spinner

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common problem among hospitalized patients with numerous etiologies. Common causes include volume depletion or renal hypoperfusion (prerenal), ATN from ischemia or nephrotoxins (intrinsic), and urinary obstruction (postrenal). For all of these etiologies, the final common pathway is an acute decline in the GFR, resulting in elevation of serum BUN and creatinine and often a decline in urine output. In most cases, patients with AKI recover with treatment of the underlying cause (e.g. IV fluids for prerenal azotemia). In some cases, however, prompt treatment with dialysis is warranted. Use the mnemonic below to remember the indications for dialysis in patients with AKI:

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CUSHINGOID – Side Effects of Corticosteroids

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By Michael Spinner

Corticosteroids are commonly prescribed medications used to suppress an overactive and unwanted immune response. This may include suppression of an immune response to innocuous, environmental antigens (allergies or asthma), self-antigens (autoimmunity), and foreign, transplanted antigens (allograft rejection).

While beneficial in reducing inflammation in these conditions, there are numerous pathologic side effects of corticosteroids, which should temper their use when possible. Remember the major side effects of corticosteroids with the mnemonic CUSHINGOID:

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Mnemonic Monday: Can you Feel your Spleen? Felty Syndrome Mnemonics

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By Molly Lewis

We’ve all done it- learn a physical exam maneuver, rush home, and check ourselves to make sure we don’t have some undiagnosed disease! (Come on, I know it’s not just me!).

Well, if you did happen to palpate an enlarged spleen, the differential diagnosis list is quite long. But, here are a couple of mnemonics to help you remember one possible cause of an oversized spleen!

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Mnemonic Monday: No More Freaking Out! Mnemonics for HTN

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By Molly Lewis

Use these mnemonics for HTN, and keep your own BP within range!

Here are two mnemonics to help you remember the causes of high blood pressure/HTN/hypertension: one for essential HTN, and one for secondary.

They’ll help you with patient diagnosis, ward rounds pimping, and when you’re counseling your patient how to live a healthier life!

(Bonus fact: the word “pimping” comes from an acronym, like many of our mnemonics! It stands for “Put In My Place.” When you can’t answer the pimping questions, you’re “put in your place” – and reminded to go memorize some more mnemonics!).

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