Mnemonics

Mnemonic Monday: AEIOU – Indications for Dialysis in Patients with Acute Kidney Injury

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By Michael Spinner

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common problem among hospitalized patients with numerous etiologies. Common causes include volume depletion or renal hypoperfusion (prerenal), ATN from ischemia or nephrotoxins (intrinsic), and urinary obstruction (postrenal). For all of these etiologies, the final common pathway is an acute decline in the GFR, resulting in elevation of serum BUN and creatinine and often a decline in urine output. In most cases, patients with AKI recover with treatment of the underlying cause (e.g. IV fluids for prerenal azotemia). In some cases, however, prompt treatment with dialysis is warranted. Use the mnemonic below to remember the indications for dialysis in patients with AKI:

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CUSHINGOID – Side Effects of Corticosteroids

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By Michael Spinner

Corticosteroids are commonly prescribed medications used to suppress an overactive and unwanted immune response. This may include suppression of an immune response to innocuous, environmental antigens (allergies or asthma), self-antigens (autoimmunity), and foreign, transplanted antigens (allograft rejection).

While beneficial in reducing inflammation in these conditions, there are numerous pathologic side effects of corticosteroids, which should temper their use when possible. Remember the major side effects of corticosteroids with the mnemonic CUSHINGOID:

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Mnemonic Monday: Can you Feel your Spleen? Felty Syndrome Mnemonics

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By Molly Lewis

We’ve all done it- learn a physical exam maneuver, rush home, and check ourselves to make sure we don’t have some undiagnosed disease! (Come on, I know it’s not just me!).

Well, if you did happen to palpate an enlarged spleen, the differential diagnosis list is quite long. But, here are a couple of mnemonics to help you remember one possible cause of an oversized spleen!

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Mnemonic Monday: No More Freaking Out! Mnemonics for HTN

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By Molly Lewis

Use these mnemonics for HTN, and keep your own BP within range!

Here are two mnemonics to help you remember the causes of high blood pressure/HTN/hypertension: one for essential HTN, and one for secondary.

They’ll help you with patient diagnosis, ward rounds pimping, and when you’re counseling your patient how to live a healthier life!

(Bonus fact: the word “pimping” comes from an acronym, like many of our mnemonics! It stands for “Put In My Place.” When you can’t answer the pimping questions, you’re “put in your place” – and reminded to go memorize some more mnemonics!).

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Mnemonic Monday: Provocative Pathophysiology – Factors that Provoke HTN

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By Molly Lewis

This mnemonic comes courtesy of a firstaidteam.com follower: Isaac Dodd (Howard University College of Medicine, MS2) – thank you so much for your contribution!

Here’s a way to remember what increases the tone of arterioles, therefore increasing peripheral vascular resistance (PVR), and therefore increasing diastolic blood pressure (DBP).

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Mnemonic Monday: Causes and Management of Hyperkalemia: C BIG K DI

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mnemonicsBy Michael Spinner

Hyperkalemia is one of the most important and frequently encountered electrolyte abnormalities. Today’s post is intended to serve as a review of the most common causes of hyperkalemia and the approach to management of this electrolyte abnormality, both acutely and chronically.

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Mnemonic Monday: Sweating Gatorade…or is he on Rifampin?

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By Molly Lewis

michael-jordan-gatoradeRifampin (RIF)– an older antibiotic still used as part of the medical management of tuberculosis, osteomyelitis, meningitis carriers, etc. It is rarely used alone, but is helpful in drug combinations.
It is bactericidal, and acts by inhibiting RNA polymerase (see specifics below).

Unfortunately, Rifampin has potential side effects (what drug doesn’t?).

Here’s a mnemonic to help you remember some of the key testable facts about rifampin:

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