Mnemonics

Mnemonic Monday: Back to Preschool!! Mnemonics for Pediatric Fine Motor Skills Milestones

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By Molly Lewis

In your Step 1 prep, you’ll most likely run across questions similar to this: “A mother brings her 4-year-old son into the pediatrician for a well-child visit. The boy is able to hop on one foot, has imaginary friends, can speak with prepositions, and can copy a circle. How is his development in terms of fine motor, gross motor, social, and verbal skills?

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Mnemonic Monday: What a Pain in the Back!

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By Joe Savarese

What a Pain in the BackAbout a year ago, I was scrolling through some medical humor website and I came across this meme. I laughed and then swiped to the next picture without a second thought. I recently came across the meme again. To be honest, I laughed again, but I also took a second to think (because overthinking is what I do best) about clerkships years.

As my third year of medical school comes to a close, I think about some of the medical conditions that are brought up over and over again by patients – vague complaints of headaches, back pain, abdominal pain, weakness, fatigue, etc. They are simple medical concepts to nearly everyone, but a wide differential diagnosis and varying clinical picture make it difficult to narrow them down to a specific condition without forgetting others.

I think organization is the key. An organized approach to the patient interview and physical exam are certainly learned skills that we practice frequently throughout the third and fourth years. As for the differential diagnosis and management, that part is up to you, books, and mnemonics. Hope this one helps for back pain. (more…)

Mnemonic Monday: PMS, Angry Ladies, and the External Carotid Artery

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By Molly Lewis

We’ve all had mini “anatomy panic attacks.” Maybe you’re in an anatomy practical and have only 30 seconds to identify the flagged structure, or maybe you’re in the OR and your attending asks: “What’s this?” Regardless of the situation, using mnemonics to remember anatomy can turn panic into confidence!

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Mnemonic Monday: 7 Cute Ladies- Mnemonics for the Patient Interview

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By Molly Lewis

Whether you are a first year in Physical Diagnosis class, a second year in Continuity Clinic, a third year seeing consults, or an attending deciding if a patient needs emergency surgery, taking a complete history is a key aspect of patient care. How can you remember everything you need to ask? Try a mnemonic!

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Deep Vein Thrombosis Risk Factors

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By Joe Savarese

Deep Vein Thrombosis Risk FactorsThe other day, while I was procrastinating from studying the intricacies of congestive heart failure, I pulled out my phone to browse social media and news outlets for something exciting (don’t judge, we all are pros at this). I came across an article about famous NBA Miami Heat basketball player, Chris Bosh, who recently suffered a blood clot that travelled to his lungs. While much has not been released about the origin of his blood clots, we know he likely experienced a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) that travelled to his lungs causing a pulmonary embolism (PE). Like a good medical student, this brought me back on track to challenge myself regarding the major risk factors of DVTs, as well as common clinical presentation and appropriate work-up.

Let’s start with the risk factors. You may already be familiar with Virchow’s triad (endothelial injury, venous stasis, and hypercoagulability), which serves as the mechanism that puts patients at an increased risk for DVTs. Here is a mnemonic to summarize the key risk factors, appropriately titled CHRIS BOSH. A more detailed list of other risk factors can be found on Medscape’s website (DVT Etiology and Risk Factors). (more…)

Mnemonic Monday: The Krebs Cycle

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By Haley Masterson

Mnemonic courtesy of First Aid for the USMLE: Step 1

Mnemonic Monday – Positions of Heart Auscultation

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By Haley Masterson

All Physicians Take Money

(Aortic, Pulmonic, Tricuspid, Mitral)

From left to right across your chest:  A is the right upper sternal border (the second right interspace), P is the left upper sternal border (the second left interspace), T is the left lower sternal border, and M is the apex.

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