Miscellaneous

‘DO NOT USE’ Abbreviations

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For those of you on rotations or looking forward to starting them, the Joint Commission has an official “Do Not Use” list. The reality is that certain abbreviations, acronyms, symbols, and dose designations may cause confusion and are therefore considered dangerous. To eliminate this confusion and ensure that patients receive the best, and the safest, possible care, health care professionals are urged to avoid using these abbreviations.

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Center for Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology (CIMIT) Announces Primary Care Innovation Winners

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By Ravish Amin

The Massachusetts General Hospital’s Ambulatory Practice of the Future (APF) and the Center for Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology (CIMIT) award annual prizes for innovation in primary care. This year’s winning concept involved rapid imaging of the retina for screening without requiring eye drops for dilation.

A novel noninvasive method for continuous glucose monitoring in diabetics, home monitoring technology for congestive heart failure designed to reduce hospital readmission, and technology facilitating identification of common pathogens in smaller blood samples were among other top-scoring entries into this year’s competition.

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ERAS applications due September 1st!

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By Vamsi K. Kancherla

The last several months spent figuring out what you want to do when you graduate from medical school have undoubtedly been difficult. In a few weeks, you will be just one button away from making your application to residency official.

September 1st marks the beginning of the application season, i.e., the first day you can register for the NRMP. Starting September 15th, you can submit your application to ACGME accredited residency programs and the administrators of these programs can find out who you are by downloading your application from the ERAS Post Office.

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The Successful First Year Medical Student

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As a first-year medical student, you already know med school is going to be hard, but in all honesty, there probably isn’t anything you’ve done up to now that will have prepared you for what you’re about to experience. You’re excited, nervous, and understandably wondering if you’re going to make it through the next four years. Well, you will. And, with help from the First Aid Team, you’ll not just make it through, you’ll make it through with flying colors.

We’ve compiled some tips – after all we used to be in your shoes –that made life just a little bit easier for those of us who have gone before. So, breathe a little easier first year students. Spend five minutes reading this post, then use what you’ve learned to help you manage your first year.

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A Message from the Editor

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By Walter Wiggins

I want to first thank Dr. Jaysson Brooks for his leadership as the Editor of the First Aid/USMLE-Rx Web Team this past year. I’d also like to thank Dr. Tao Le for giving me the opportunity to take the helm for the coming year. My hope is that we will continue bettering our efforts to serve your needs and maybe provide a little entertainment along the way. I want to start by informing you, our readers, of a few changes that we’ll be making this year in an effort to improve the quality of our outreach on our blog, Facebook, and Twitter.

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Get Started on Your Residency Application

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By Vamsi K. Kancherla

This time of year marks the annual start of the residency application process through ERAS (electronic residency application service) for every 4th year medical student pursuing a residency position in the specialty of his or her choice. Like your application to college and medical school, you’ll need to gather a number of documents in a timely fashion. Below, we’ll cover the key components of your residency application, separated into two categories: items for which you are primarily responsible and items that your medical school will complete on your behalf. Additionally, be on the lookout for the ERAS “token” (provided by your Dean’s Office) to enter the ERAS website, and be sure to keep your AAMC ID and password in a safe, secure area.

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Get Ready for the Osteopathic Match

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By Ravish Amin

The American Osteopathic Association (AOA) Match program for osteopathic medical students places medical students into OGME-1 preliminary, OGME-1 traditional, or OGME-1 resident programs. Osteopathic medical students can find Osteopathic Intern and Residency programs listed on the Opportunities website (http://www.opportunities.osteopathic.org/) that are approved by the AOA Program and Trainee Review Council (PTRC). Options for medical students include:

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