FirstAid-RStigall

FirstAid-RStigall

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What’s Your (Learning) Type? How Your Personality Determines Your Study Type

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By Mark Ard

Whats Your Learning Type 1“Hey gurl, you’re an ISFP? I’m an ENTJ, wanna make some flashcards together?”

What? You’ve never used a Myers-Briggs pick up line? Yeah me neither, but if you want to classify and better approach how you relate to knowledge and learning, then hopefully my next couple of posts will help you become a more awesome medical student by better knowing thyself.

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is broken down across four domains to determine how individuals perceive, process, and ultimately interact with the world. It’s one of the most researched psychometric personality inventories around.

The 4 Preferences:

  • Where you get your energy: Extraversion vs. Introversion
  • How you gather information: Sensor vs. Intuitive
  • How you make decisions: Thinking vs. Feeling
  • How you order your life: Judging vs. Perceiving

In this Part 1, we are going to cover E vs. I and J vs. P (more…)

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3878

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Check out today’s Step 1 Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3878A 75-year-old homeless alcoholic man presents to the emergency department complaining of shortness of breath, high fever, shaking chills, and a productive cough. His temperature is 39.6°C (103.2°F), pulse is 110/min, respiratory rate is 27/min, and blood pressure is 130/85 mm Hg. X-ray of the chest shows a diffuse infiltrate. Gram staining of his sputum culture resembles that shown in the image.

Which of the following antibiotics would be appropriate for this patient’s illness?

A. Amphotericin B
B. Aztreonam
C. Clavulanic acid
D. Isoniazid
E. Vancomycin

———————–

Want to know the ‘bottom line?’ Purchase a USMLE-Rx Subscription and get many more features, more questions, and passages from First Aid, including images, references, and other facts relevant to this question.

This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 1 test bank. For more USMLE Step 1 prep, subscribe to our Flash Facts and Step 1 Express video series. Score the best deal on all three products with a Step 1 Triple Play Bundle.

Having Outlets in Med School: My Step 1 Sonnet

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By Tim Durso

Having Outlets in Med School - My Step 1 SonnetI’ve long since admired a poet’s ability to take an experience and mold it into a relatable and elegant form. I’ve dabbled with my own poetry (which admittedly is rough at best) from time to time as a sort of creative outlet for whenever I’m feeling stressed or bored (a.k.a. throughout med school). I don’t always write them down, but sometimes they help me work through my emotions and release them in a constructive way.

Below I’ve included a sonnet about my experiences leading up to taking Step 1: (more…)

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3866

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Check out today’s Step 1 Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3866A 17-year-old girl presents with 4 months of fatigue, night sweats, constant low-grade fever, and a 9.1-kg (20-lb) unintentional weight loss. A large mass is palpable in the left upper quadrant, 8 cm below the costal margin. It is suspected that an infiltrative process led to organomegaly, and the organ is scheduled to be surgically removed. Results of a lymph node biopsy are shown in the image.

What preventative treatment should be considered prior to surgery in this patient?

A. Intravenous vancomycin daily
B. Oral acyclovir daily
C. Oral metronidazole daily
D. Vaccination for influenza A and B
E. Vaccinations against pneumococcus and Haemophilus influenzae

———————–

Want to know the ‘bottom line?’ Purchase a USMLE-Rx Subscription and get many more features, more questions, and passages from First Aid, including images, references, and other facts relevant to this question.

This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 1 test bank. For more USMLE Step 1 prep, subscribe to our Flash Facts and Step 1 Express video series. Score the best deal on all three products with a Step 1 Triple Play Bundle.

Achieving Happiness While Studying for the Boards

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By Mark Ard

“Don’t aim at success—the more you aim at it and make it a target, the more you are going to miss it. For success, like happiness, cannot be pursued; it must ensue…as the unintended side-effect of one’s personal dedication to a course greater than oneself.”
– Vicktor Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning

In the bestselling book “Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience” author Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi’s takes on the very difficult topic of happiness and what conditions put people into the state of “flow” that only seems achievable to world-class extreme athletes (think about the Red Bull Wingsuit). Below are six conditions to achieving this state of eudaemonia and how you can get there yourself while studying for boards. I also highly recommend the book for people who need an answer to “what books have you read recently?”

1. Intense and focused concentration on the present moment. One of the most difficult aspects of medical school is getting into “study mood” for a sustained period of time. You need to be ruthless in your demand for presence. The easiest way is to have a dedicated study location. You can even have a few, one for solo-studying and one for group-studying. When you feel yourself fading, get out of that place, physically. Your study place is no place for day-dreaming. You will tell your patients the same thing for insomnia as “in-study-a.” Think about it. You tell patients to try to sleep, but if they can’t, get out of bed and go do something else. Bed is only for sleep…and sex. (more…)

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3865

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Check out today’s Step 1 Qmax Question Challenge.

Know the answer? Post it below! Don’t forget to check back for an update with the correct answer and explanation (we’ll post it in the comments section below).

USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax Challenge #3865A 9-year-old boy with massive swelling of his right mandible is seen during a medical relief mission. He has lost a significant amount of weight over the past 2 months. In addition he has night sweats requiring a change in his bedclothes. He has no cough, murmur, or change in bowel habits. A biopsy of the spleen is taken, and results are shown in the image.

What translocation is likely present in the malignant cells shown in the image?

A. t(8;14)
B. t(9;22)
C. t(11;14)
D. t(14;18)
E. t(15;17)

———————–

Want to know the ‘bottom line?’ Purchase a USMLE-Rx Subscription and get many more features, more questions, and passages from First Aid, including images, references, and other facts relevant to this question.

This practice question is an actual question from the USMLE-Rx Step 1 test bank. For more USMLE Step 1 prep, subscribe to our Flash Facts and Step 1 Express video series. Score the best deal on all three products with a Step 1 Triple Play Bundle.

Put the power of USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax on your iPhone!

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The First Aid Team and USMLE-Rx are excited to announce the long-awaited release of Step 1 Qmax for iOS!

Get it now!

On-the-go access to 2,300+ high yield Step 1 questions

Images and explanations integrated with First Aid for the USMLE Step 1

All your tests sync to the cloud for immediate access on any computer

Quiz yourself in multiple test modes with different question types

Get detailed performance stats by organ system and discipline

Review, annotate, and/or delete completed tests

The only app created and approved by First Aid authors.

iPhone qmax

Get it now!

*Requires a valid USMLE-Rx Step 1 Qmax subscription.

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